Dead Man’s Fingers

Dead Man's Fingers

Yet another fungus with no resemblence to the stereotype of the toadstool shape.

Xylaria polymorpha can indeed be imagined as long-decayed human fingers. Found on fallen and rotten wood.

Harlequin ladybird

Harlequin ladybird

This north American species is, by some accounts, threatening to displace the various European species.

This one seems to be under attack by the much smaller aphids, which are in reality its prey.

Honey fungus

Honey fungus

Armillaria mellea are very variable in appearance. A common fungus, which lives off trees.

Honey fungus

Once the fungus gets established, it throws out a whole cluster of fruiting bodies near the base of the trunk. It is always fatal for the tree.

Haws

Haws

Autumn is definitely coming when the hawthorn berries take on their full red brightness.

Harvestman

Harvestman

What has eight legs and isn’t a spider?

Lots of creatures, actually. This harvestman is indeed an arachnid, but nevertheless not a spider.

Shaggy parasol

Shaggy Parasol

The shaggy parasol, lepiota rhacodes, is one of the most distinctive of the toadstool-shaped fungi.

This specimen had only recently emerged. If it is not disturbed, the cap will flatten as it grows, eventually spreading out to as much as six inches wide while keeping the flaky appearance.

Glistening inkcap

Glistening inkcap

Another inkcap species. Coprinus micaceus gets its official name because the new toadstools, as here, appear to be sprinkled with flecks of mica.

This specimen was growing unnoticed on a tree stump within inches of a kerb.

Toadflax

Toadflax flower

This linarea vulgaris was thriving on a patch of overgrown ground overlooked by the bridge where the trains heading north from Wolverhampton first cross the Birmingham canal.

Squirrel

Squirrel

This grey squirrel was leaping around in the grounds of Bantock Park like it was still full of the joys of spring.

Hogweed

Cow parsnip

The cow parsley or hogweed, Anthriscus sylvestris, is normally a summer-blooming plant. This specimen, on the edge of Valley Park, still had fine flowers when these pictures were taken on October 1st.

Cow parsnip