Collared earthstars, Compton Hill, a second visit

Collared earthstars, Compton Hill, a second visit

As I was in the area anyway, I went for a second look at the collared earth stars on Compton Hill. In the two days since my previous visit, a couple of new fruiting bodies had emerged, looking like they had not yet completely opened. I couldn’t see any signs of change in the fruiting bodies which had already been there.

Magnolia in a front garden, second flowering

Magnolia in a front garden, second flowering

Magnolia in autumn, buds developing for a second flowering of the year. On a bush in the front garden of a house facing on to Bantock Park.

Tiny nuthatch, Bantock Park

Tiny nuthatch, Bantock Park

Nuthatch, tiny, at the base of one of the Nantock Park trees. It had climbed down the trunk, as is their wont, with something in its beak. Perhaps it was a nut. It banged it agaist the roots, two or three times. A pause, then the bird flew off.

Pleated inkcap pair in wood chip mulch, Bantock Park

Pleated inkcap pair in wood chip mulch, Bantock Park

Two pleated inkcap mushrooms, tiny and elegant, growing among the wood chip mulch in one of the beds in Bantock Park. These fungi are quite common, but they are often half-hidden, lurking in the short grass which is one of their favoured habitats.

Collared earth stars, Compton Hill

Collared earth stars, Compton Hill

Collared earth stars by the side of the main road near the top of Compton hill. They are sometimes called saucered earth stars, or triple earth stars, and more formally Geastrum triplex, and are by far the most common members of the earth star genus round here. There’s a chance of spotting them any time from now till early in spring.

Ornamental grass, Castle Gardens, Bridgnorth

Ornamental grass, Castle Gardens, Bridgnorth

A small clump of tall ornamental grass in one of the beds in Castle Grounds Park, Bridgnorth. In my opinion, it looks at its best in early autumn.

Well-chewed fly agaric under holly, Bantock Park

Well-chewed fly agaric under holly, bantock Park

The first fly agaric I’ve seen this season, under a holly which was itself intruding into a beech hedge in Bantock Park. It had been extensively eaten, probably by at least two different creatures: a mollusc and a mammal.

All the colours …

All the colours ...

Early evening, a short but sharp shower, and a resulting rainbow.

All the colours ...

Hooks all the way down

Hooks all the way down

Two close-ups of a seed-head of a teazle as the seeds ripen towards maturity. Each seed is attached to a long spike which has a hook at the far end, perfect for getting stuck in the fur of some animal which will then disperse the seed well away from the parent plant. These close views show the spikes are covered in lesser hooks all down towards the seeds themselves.

Hooks all the way down

Ambersnail on bulrush leaf

Ambersnail on bulrush leaf

One of the common water snails on the leaf of a bulrush, in the pool in Compton Park. The pictures which show both edges of the leaf give some idea of how tiny it was – leaf was somewhat under an inch broad.

A genteel paddle at the river’s edge

A genteel paddle at the river

Carrion crow standing in shallow water at the edge of the Severn in Bridgnorth. It occasionally took a beakful of water, but it wasn’t acting like it was their mainly for a drink.

Deodar cones, Bantock

Deodar cones, Bantock

Cones on a deodar, standing upright on the branch. There’s a small stand of the trees at the edge of the wildflower meadow, Bantock Park.

Deodar cones, Bantock