Earth tongues (genus Geoglossum) and bonnets (genus Mycena)

Earth tongues (genus Geoglossum) and bonnets (genus Mycena)

More tiny fungi just rising up through the short grass of a lawn. Earth tongues, black, velvety-looking and yes, perhaps, slightly resembling tongues. I’d have had to get a lot closer to try to work out which precise species they were. Growing intermingled with them were bonnets, a more conventional mushroom shape, delicate-looking on their slender stems.

The lawn they were on was in front of one of the houses in a quiet cul de sac.

Perton pools, misty morning

Perton pools, misty morning

Views across the two pools at Perton, one of the misty mornings last month.

Wrinkled club fungi on a lawn

Wrinkled club fungi on a lawn

Growing on the front lawn of a block of flats, conveniently at waist height, wrinkled club fungi rising as tall as the short grass. The final two pictures are of some growing in Old Nursery Wood, a lot more wrinkled.

Webs galore, dewy morning

Webs galore, dewy morning

The same misty, dewy morning as yesterday’s webbed dock pictures, an entire field of rough grass, each tussock covered in its web.

Violet crust, Bantock

Violet crust, Bantock

Violet crust fungus, showing where the delicate violet colour fades with age. On the same felled tree at Bantock Park as the black bulgar in a post yesterday.

Webbed dock, dewy morning

Webbed dock, dewy morning

A misty morning recently, with heavy dew. I was taken with this spider’s web, covering the skeletal remains of a dock plant like a tent.

Webbed dock, dewy morning

Crow after breadcrumbs

Crow after breadcrumbs

A carrion crow assiduously pecking at some very finely crumbled bread which had been left out for birds at the foot of a tree.

Black bulgar, Bantock

Black bulgar, Bantock

Black bulgar which was growing on a tree felled by the tiny pond, Bantock Park. It had been growing quite high on the tree, possibly not visible from the ground before the felling. A few days after these pictures were taken, so was the felled wood – only a very low stump now remains.

Collared earth stars, Perton, two visits

Collared earth stars, Perton, two visits

Collared earth stars growing by the footpath along the Penk at Perton.

I took these shots on two visits, a week and a half of so apart. No visible signs of change in the fungi between these two occasions, other than a sharp drop in number. On my first visit there had been eight or nine. Second visit (last five pics) this was down to two. I doubt it was vandalism – the fungi are quite inconspicuous.

Water bridge, slightly misty morning

Water bridge, slightly misty morning

The mist that morning had only been light, and was already beginning to rise. Still, it slightly muted the autumn colours of the leaves of the trees along the canal where Tunstall Water Bridge carries the Smestow Brook across the canal.

Purple brittlegills on a lawn

Purple brittlegills on a lawn

Two purple brittlegill mushrooms on the lawn in front of the flats opposite Bantock Park, a lanw which seems to produce a variety of mushroom species. These sometimes also called purple russulas.

Autumn leaf colours, Bantock Park

Autumn leaf colours, Bantock Park

A beech and a hornbeam, Bantock Park, back when the leaves had turned to their autumn colours, but while most were still on their trees.

Autumn leaf colours, Bantock Park