Almost gone: shaggy inkcaps

Almost gone: shaggy inkcaps

Coprinus species fungi like these shaggy inkcaps shed their spores by deliquescing: the caps turn to a gooey black mess from the rim inwards. In the specimens pictured the process has gone to the end. The caps are almost gone. Traces of remains of the goo can be seen shadowing the stems.

Almost gone: shaggy inkcaps

Misty clearings, Himley Plantation

Misty clearing, Himley Plantation

Misty late October day. It was already mid=morning by the time I reached Himley Plantation. In open spaces, the mist had already lifted. In the clearings in the wood, a trace of the mist still present, just enough to transform the scene by catching the sunbeams forcing their way through the gaps in the trees.

False saffron milk cap in short grass, West Park

False saffron milk cap in short grass, West Park

False saffron milk cap mushroom growing in short grass near conifers, West Park. The green colour of the cap develops as the mushroom matures. When it’s fresher, the cap is the yellow shade which can still just be made out around the rim. At that point, it is often confused with the saffron milkcap, also known as the delicious milkcap.

False saffron milk cap in short grass, West Park

That species is, as the name implies, a foodie favourite. This, more common one has a bitter, unpleasant taste.