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Goose

Goose

There were only traces of colour on the feathers and beak of this goose, which is probably a cross between a barnacle goose and a white one.

It was happily swimming in the canada goose flock in West Park.

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Shaggy parasol

Shaggy parasol

This recently emerged specimen of Coprinus comatus shows the beginning of the cracking of the cap covering which will eventually become the “shagginess” when it is more fully-grown.

This pattern is seen in the more developed, and parasol-shaped, fruiting body below.

Shaggy parasol

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Lifecycle of a toadstool

Shaggy inkcap

This is what a shaggy inkcap, also known as the lawyer’s wig fungus, looks like when it has only recently emerged.

As it sheds its spores, the cap of the mushroom appears to eat itself from the rim inwards.  This one is well on the way.

Shaggy inkcap

This grouping show more advanced stages in the process.

Shaggy inkcap

Finally, the cap is reduced to a blackened rim around the stem.

Shaggy inkcap

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Yew berries

Yew

These yew berries don’t just look beautiful. They appear good enough to eat. But, like virtually every part of the tree, they are poisonous.

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Red Admiral

Red Admiral

This red admiral looked in fine shape as it was feeding on ivy flowers yesterday, even though this week is the last one when this species is normally seen in Britain.

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Puffballs

Puffball

The prolonged spell of dry weather means that this has been a poor autumn for mushrooms so far. But a recent expedition to West Park still showed several species, mostly of small, inconspicuous fungi which could hide even in short grass.

Posts in the next few days come from this outing on October 25th unless otherwise indicated.

For the first find, these small puffballs – perhaps a centimetre in diameter – were lurking in the sculpture garden behind the Conservatory.

Puffball