Red cracked bolete

Red cracked bolete

Boletes are toadstool fungi which have pores rather than gills at the base of the caps, through which to release their pores.

This common bolete is one of the easiest boletes to recognise. The upper surface of the cap appears to crack, revealing pinkish or reddish flesh below.

Winter detail

Frosty leaves

Frosted leaves, a sycamore key and a tiny web.

But already the new year’s growth is peeping through.

Ash

Ash buds

Bunches of keys holding last year’s fruit hang from the same branches of the ash tree which are already showing the buds of the new year’s growth.

Ash keys

Moorhen on ice

Moorhen

Moorhen striding gingerly over the frozen boating lake in West Park.

Freezing lake

Icy ash keys

Even a partial freezing of the West Park boating lake is causing a problem for these birds.

Squirrel

Squirrel

The squirrels of West Park are so used to being fed that it is moot whether they are wild.

Fly agaric again

Fly agaric

These are such spectacular mushrooms, so here are another couple of them.

Fly agaric

Split porecrust

Split porecrust

This fungus looks like a congealed foam on rotting wood, including, as here, on tree stumps.

This closer view also shows tiny puffballs nearby.

Split porecrust

Canada geese feeding

Canada geese feeding

This flock were systematically going over the patch of ground which was very soft after recent rainfall.

Canada geese feeding

Lilac bonnet

Lilac bonnet

This delicately coloured mushroom grows in leaf litter – here at the roadside by the Million, a Forestry Commission wood near Kinver.

Lilac bonnet

Tiny mushroom

Tiny mushroom

This tiny mushroom was growing from a tree trunk.

Holly berries

Holly berries

Holly has bright red berries as winter comes, and deep green leaves all year long. It’s easy to see why it should be taken as a mid-winter decoration symbolising continuing life.

Holly berries