Bee

Bee

Another view of a bee collecting ivy pollen, showing just how much they can cram into their pollen sacs.

Web

Web

Overnight rain drew attention to the complex 3-dimensional structure of this spider’s web.

Nightshade

Woody nightshade berries

The woody nightshade berries always stand out against their background. Here the bright sunlight made them even more vivid than usual.

Snail

Snail

This snail was using the mortar as a trackway as it inched along the top of a low brick garden wall on 10th October.

Bee

Bee

The amount of pollen in the pollen baskets casts doubt on whether this bee would have been able to carry it all back home, but still she kept gathering more.

Nettle

Nettle flower

Growing almost to eye level in the field behind Compton lock on the Staffs and Worcs canal.

Heron

Heron in reeds

Its watchful position in the middle of a small reed bed gave this heron the confidence to ignore the constant stream of people along the towpath on the opposite bank of the Staffs and Worcs canal.

Mushroom

Wood mushroom

This mushroom was growing on a pile of wood chips which appeared to have been dumped on a grassy verge.

Wood mushroom

Autumn

Autumn

The view across the lowest pool in Baggeridge Country Park on 12th October.

Earth Star

Earth Star

Geastrum triplex, to give it its official name, is one fungus which would be missed by someone just on the lookout for the classic toadstool shape.

This one disperses its spores through the hole visible in the centre.

This post, along with the harlequin ladybird and the dead man’s fingers, with thanks to the Wildside Activity Centre Fungi Foray, led by Sue Shanks.

Red admiral

Red admiral

This butterfly was resting on a hawthorn branch on 26th September.

Dead Man’s Fingers

Dead Man's Fingers

Yet another fungus with no resemblence to the stereotype of the toadstool shape.

Xylaria polymorpha can indeed be imagined as long-decayed human fingers. Found on fallen and rotten wood.