Shaggy parasol

Shaggy Parasol

The shaggy parasol, lepiota rhacodes, is one of the most distinctive of the toadstool-shaped fungi.

This specimen had only recently emerged. If it is not disturbed, the cap will flatten as it grows, eventually spreading out to as much as six inches wide while keeping the flaky appearance.

Hogweed

Cow parsnip

The cow parsley or hogweed, Anthriscus sylvestris, is normally a summer-blooming plant. This specimen, on the edge of Valley Park, still had fine flowers when these pictures were taken on October 1st.

Cow parsnip

Inkcap again

Inkcap

A closer view of inkcaps already posted here. The picture above is of the newest mushroom, which has a surface still covered in fine white hair-like structures.

The other picture shows the second-newest, with the rim of the cap already marked by the ongoing deliquescence.

Inkcap

These are probably coprinus lagopides, a reasonably common inkcap, though one without a vernacular name. Alternatively, it may be the less frequently encountered coprinus lagopus.

Razor strop fungus

Razor strop fungus

This is a common fungus which grows directly from the trunks of birch trees.
The specimen here was one of many fruiting bodies growing from a fallen rotten birch in a former railway cutting in Valley Park. Possibly the rot was caused by this fungus, which is responsible for the loss of many birch trees.

Razor strop fungus

This fungus is also known as the birch polypore. It was pure white when it first appeared a couple of days ago. The visible parts can survive for up to a year, gradually getting more darkly brown.

Piptoporus betulinus was used to sharpen old-fashioned cut-throat razors. Hence the name.